Academic institutions grant commercial license for CRISPR-based SHERLOCK diagnostic technology in developed world – Rights are protected for broad use in developing world and for public health needs. Broad Institute March 21, 2019


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  • – > Mestrado – Dissertation – Tabelas, Figuras e Gráficos – Tables, Figures and Graphics´´My´´ Dissertation @ #Innovation #energy #life #health #Countries #Time #Researches #Reference #Graphics #Ages #Age #Mice #People #Person #Mouse #Genetics #PersonalizedMedicine #Diagnosis #Prognosis #Treatment #Disease #UnknownDiseases #Future #VeryEfficientDrugs #VeryEfficientVaccines #VeryEfficientTherapeuticalSubstances #Tests #Laboratories #Investments #Details #HumanLongevity #DNA #Cell #Memory #Physiology #Nanomedicine #Nanotechnology #Biochemistry #NewMedicalDevices #GeneticEngineering #Internet #History #Science #World

Pathol Res Pract. 2012 Jul 15;208(7):377-81. doi: 10.1016/j.prp.2012.04.006. Epub 2012 Jun 8.

The influence of physical activity in the progression of experimental lung cancer in mice

Renato Batista Paceli 1Rodrigo Nunes CalCarlos Henrique Ferreira dos SantosJosé Antonio CordeiroCassiano Merussi NeivaKazuo Kawano NagaminePatrícia Maluf Cury


Impact_Fator-wise_Top100Science_Journals

GRUPO_AF1GROUP AFA1 – Aerobic Physical Activity – Atividade Física Aeróbia – ´´My´´ Dissertation – Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto

GRUPO AFAN 1GROUP AFAN1 – Anaerobic Physical ActivityAtividade Física Anaeróbia – ´´My´´ Dissertation – Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto

GRUPO_AF2GROUP AFA2 – Aerobic Physical ActivityAtividade Física Aeróbia – ´´My´´ Dissertation – Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto

GRUPO AFAN 2GROUP AFAN 2 – Anaerobic Physical ActivityAtividade Física Anaeróbia´´My´´ Dissertation – Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto

Slides – mestrado´´My´´ Dissertation – Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto

CARCINÓGENO DMBA EM MODELOS EXPERIMENTAIS

DMBA CARCINOGEN IN EXPERIMENTAL MODELS

Avaliação da influência da atividade física aeróbia e anaeróbia na progressão do câncer de pulmão experimental – Summary – Resumo´´My´´ Dissertation Faculty of Medicine of Sao Jose do Rio Preto

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22683274/

Abstract

Lung cancer is one of the most incident neoplasms in the world, representing the main cause of mortality for cancer. Many epidemiologic studies have suggested that physical activity may reduce the risk of lung cancer, other works evaluate the effectiveness of the use of the physical activity in the suppression, remission and reduction of the recurrence of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic and anaerobic physical activity in the development and the progression of lung cancer. Lung tumors were induced with a dose of 3mg of urethane/kg, in 67 male Balb – C type mice, divided in three groups: group 1_24 mice treated with urethane and without physical activity; group 2_25 mice with urethane and subjected to aerobic swimming free exercise; group 3_18 mice with urethane, subjected to anaerobic swimming exercise with gradual loading 5-20% of body weight. All the animals were sacrificed after 20 weeks, and lung lesions were analyzed. The median number of lesions (nodules and hyperplasia) was 3.0 for group 1, 2.0 for group 2 and 1.5-3 (p=0.052). When comparing only the presence or absence of lesion, there was a decrease in the number of lesions in group 3 as compared with group 1 (p=0.03) but not in relation to group 2. There were no metastases or other changes in other organs. The anaerobic physical activity, but not aerobic, diminishes the incidence of experimental lung tumors.

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

http://news.mit.edu/2019/license-sherlock-diagnostic-crispr-0321?fbclid=IwAR1xQDCNrvbAoTDKyM0s1Q3YaTg1t3YdjL0mZmCFaldgKOSKpr_ZQ9_KDs0

https://www.broadinstitute.org/

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  • A group of academic institutions has granted a license for SHERLOCK, the highly-sensitive, low-cost CRISPR-based diagnostic, for commercial uses in the developed world, while reserving rights to enable its broad use by organizations to serve developing nations as well as unmet public health needs in the developed world. Full Screen
  • A group of academic institutions has granted a license for SHERLOCK, the highly-sensitive, low-cost CRISPR-based diagnostic, for commercial uses in the developed world, while reserving rights to enable its broad use by organizations to serve developing nations as well as unmet public health needs in the developed world. Full Screen
  • A group of academic institutions has granted a license for SHERLOCK, the highly-sensitive, low-cost CRISPR-based diagnostic, for commercial uses in the developed world, while reserving rights to enable its broad use by organizations to serve developing nations as well as unmet public health needs in the developed world. Full Screen

Academic institutions grant commercial license for CRISPR-based SHERLOCK diagnostic technology in developed world

Rights are protected for broad use in developing world and for public health needs.

Broad Institute
March 21, 2019 Press Inquiries

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The following press release was issued today by the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

A group of academic institutions has granted a license for SHERLOCK™, the highly-sensitive, low-cost CRISPR-based diagnostic, for commercial uses in the developed world, while reserving rights to enable its broad use by organizations to serve developing nations as well as unmet public health needs in the developed world.

First unveiled in 2017, SHERLOCK lifts a barrier to rapid deployment of diagnostics in outbreak zones. The system (which stands for Specific High-sensitivity Enzymatic Reporter unLOCKing), allows clinicians to quickly and inexpensively diagnose disease and track epidemics, such as Ebola and Zika, without the need for extensive specialized equipment. SHERLOCK can detect the presence of viruses with an unmatched degree of sensitivity in clinical samples like blood or saliva.

Under an agreement announced today, the institutions — Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Wageningen, and University of Tokyo — have granted a license to Sherlock Biosciences Inc., a biotechnology company.

The license provides a limited exclusive right, under the Broad Institute’s inclusive innovation model, to deploy SHERLOCK diagnostic tools for commercial applications in the developed world.

“Because SHERLOCK is simple and inexpensive, it holds impressive potential for transforming how we detect disease,” said Issi Rozen, chief business officer at the Broad Institute. “It is therefore important to ensure creative commercial innovation while at the same time protecting access to new diagnostic tools in the developing world, and for public health applications in the developed world, where they are desperately needed. We designed our licensing strategy to accomplish this.” (Rozen will serve as an academic representative on the board of directors of Sherlock Biosciences, but will receive no personal compensation.)

The licensing agreement announced today does not cover SHERLOCK’s use in the developing world. In addition, the license is not exclusive for certain public health applications in the developed world — for example, the licensing structure is designed to make SHERLOCK available to help health care professionals quickly diagnose a host of circulating bacterial and viral infections such as malaria, tuberculosis, Zika, and rotavirus, among others. For such purposes, the academic coalition will ensure SHERLOCK is made widely available. In addition, SHERLOCK tools, knowledge, and methods will continue to be made freely available for academic research worldwide.

The technology was developed by a team of scientists from the Broad Institute, the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT, the Institute for Medical Engineering & Science at MIT, the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, MGH, Rutgers, and Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology. It is a rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive diagnostic tool with the potential for a transformative effect on research and global public health.

“Skoltech is proud to be working with Broad Institute and the international academic community to address important medical challenges facing humanity, save lives and improve health and well-being for the world’s citizens,” said Professor Alexander Kuleshov, President of Skoltech, and Member of the Russian National Academy of Sciences.

Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard was launched in 2004 to empower this generation of creative scientists to transform medicine. The Broad Institute seeks to describe all the molecular components of life and their connections; discover the molecular basis of major human diseases; develop effective new approaches to diagnostics and therapeutics; and disseminate discoveries, tools, methods, and data openly to the entire scientific community.

Founded by MIT, Harvard, Harvard-affiliated hospitals, and the visionary Los Angeles philanthropists Eli and Edythe L. Broad, the Broad Institute includes faculty, professional staff, and students from throughout the MIT and Harvard biomedical research communities and beyond, with collaborations spanning over a hundred private and public institutions in more than 40 countries worldwide. For further information about the Broad Institute, go to http://www.broadinstitute.org.


Topics: CRISPRGenone editingDNARNAGeneticsBiological engineeringBroad InstituteMcGovern InstituteBrain and cognitive sciencesSchool of ScienceSchool of EngineeringMedicineDiseaseCancerHealth sciences and technologyInnovation and Entrepreneurship (I&E)

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